(248) 281-2020 |
Contact Us

26200 Lahser Road, Suite 300
Southfield, Michigan 48033-7157

 

PVM Blog

“Serving Seniors & Communities” is Presbyterian Villages of Michigan’s tagline and our commitment. It’s our goal to be a first-line provider of resources, including information. Aging should be an adventure, not a scary trip!

In the PVM Blog, the experts at PVM will regularly publish articles and information. Topics may range from smart ways to age in place in your long-time home, to tips on how to shop for a senior community. We will have articles on transportation, wellness, nutrition, technology, activities, outlook-on-life, and more.

In last month’s column I shared that due to some minor repair work I spent a little over a week without a car, yet still had things to do and places to be. Heeding the advice of my daughter’s boyfriend, I decided to look for apps I could download onto my smartphone that would help address this dilemma.

Recently I experienced good karma in a way which affirms my belief in caring about others. My grandma was right when she used to say: "What goes around comes around." I have witnessed this phenomena in many ways over the years. In my recent experience I was attending an annual meeting with an organization still somewhat new to me; and more than several attendees reached out to me in an intentional manner to include me and make me feel welcome. I am usually that person that notices when a fellow human being needs to be welcomed so this was a gratifying experience for me.

A few weeks ago I experienced - temporarily – what many of us will perhaps one day experience permanently: life without a car. Some of you may already be in that situation. I still had to go to work. I still had meetings to attend. I still had errands to run but I had no car. It was in the shop for some minor repairs that of course took longer to fix than I was originally told so when all was said and done, I was without a car for a little over a week.

Providing care for an aging family member is becoming the new normal. Approximately 10 million adult children over the age of 50 (that’s roughly a quarter of all Baby Boomers!), according to research conducted by Metlife, have taken on the role of caregiver for their aging parents.

Over the years our Girl Scout and Boy Scout leaders as well as teachers and parents have told us to BE PREPARED. This advice takes on new meaning when we prepare others for the inevitable time when we will pass away and leave the responsibility of handling our affairs over to our loved ones. When we go not prepare we can inadvertently cause much consternation and difficulty for those left behind.